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The grammatical behaviour of words

agree with

if a word such as a verb or adjective agrees with a noun or pronoun, it has the correct form for the noun or pronoun, according to whether it is singular or plural, masculine or feminine

cataphora

noun

the use of a word or phrase in a sentence that stands for a word or phrase that is used later. An example of cataphora is the use of the word “she” in the sentence “She was running late, so Sue grabbed a quick sandwich.”

cohesion

noun

a relationship between sentences or parts of a piece of writing that is shown by particular words or phrases

collocate

verb

words that collocate are often used together

collocation

noun

the fact that a word collocates with other words

comparison

noun

changes in the form of an adjective or adverb to show that someone or something has more of a quality, such as the change from “good” to “better” and “best”

complementation

noun

the words or phrases used as complements in a sentence

concord

noun

the fact of a word such as verb or adjective having the correct form for the noun or pronoun that goes with it, according to whether it is singular or plural, masculine or feminine, first person or second person, etc.

conjugate

verb

to state the different forms a verb can have, for example according to the number of people it refers to and whether it refers to the present, past, or future

conjugate

verb

if a verb conjugates, it has different forms

construction

noun

the way in which words are put together to form a sentence or phrase

declension

noun

the process by which the form of nouns, adjectives, or pronouns changes in some languages depending on their relationship to other words in a sentence

decline

verb

if a noun, adjective, or pronoun declines, its form changes depending on its relationship to other words in a sentence

decline

verb

to list all the forms of the declension of a noun, adjective, or pronoun

deep structure

noun

the logical relationships on which the different parts of a phrase or sentence are based

ellipsis

noun

the practice of leaving a word or words out of a sentence when they are not necessary for understanding it

inflect

verb

if a word inflects, you change its form to go with the grammar of the other words you are using with it

inflect

verb

if a language inflects, it has words that do this

inflection

noun

changes in the basic form of a word to show something such as tense or number

inflection

noun

an addition or a change to the basic form of a word

modify

verb

to add to the meaning of another word or a phrase by giving more information about it

passivize

verb

to change a sentence so that the verb becomes passive

qualify

verb

a word that qualifies another word gives more information about it. For example, in “the dog barked furiously,” the adverb “furiously” qualifies the verb “barked.”

surface structure

noun

the structure that a sentence has when you consider only the classes of its words, which may be different when you also consider the meaning of the sentence, as opposed to the logical relationships on which this structure is based

kabaddi

a game in which two teams of seven players take turns to chase and try to touch players on the opposing team

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

Ouch!

a response to a scathing comment or unpleasant situation

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