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high

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adjective high pronunciation in British English /haɪ/ 
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adjectivehigh
comparativehigher
superlativehighest
  1. 1
    large in size from the top to the ground

    very high mountains

    the highest (=tallest) building

    The fence is too high to climb over.

    1. a.
      in a position a long way above the ground

      beautiful sunny weather with just a few high clouds

      The boiling point of water is lower at high altitudes.

      the highest shelf

    2. b.
      if a river is high, the water is above its usual level, for example because of heavy rain

      The river is so high that only small boats can pass under the bridge.

    3. c.
      used in measurements of how big or how far above the ground an object is. This is called height

      Some of the waves are fifteen feet high.

      How high is that ceiling?

  2. 2
    large in amount

    high prices/temperatures/wages

    This is an area of high unemployment.

    Interest rates are very high.

    Casualties were highest near the centre of the earthquake.

    Music was being played at high volume.

    high risk of something:

    The risk of the disease spreading is high.

    the high twenties/nineties etc:

    temperatures in the high twenties (=between 27 and 30 degrees)

    a high level/incidence of something:

    The pipes contain a high level of lead.

    high number/volume/proportion of something:

    A high proportion of the population are immigrants.

    1. a.
      used for describing a country's money when it is more valuable than the money of other countries

      A high yen makes Japanese exports more expensive.

      The Euro edged higher against the dollar.

    2. b.
      containing a lot of something
      high in:

      Ice cream is very high in calories.

  3. 3
    very good, or excellent
    high standard:

    They expect high standards of care.

    high quality:

    They're known for the high quality of their products.

    high opinion/regard/esteem:

    She has a very high opinion of herself.

    I have the highest regard for him.

    1. a.
      if you have high hopes or expectations, you hope or expect that something very good will happen

      They have high hopes for this week's game.

      I think their expectations were too high.

  4. 4
    important compared to other people or things, especially in a particular system or organization

    What is the highest rank in the army?

    high position/status/rank:

    Teachers no longer enjoy the high social status they once had.

    high priority:

    Both parties are giving high priority to education in their campaigns.

  5. 5
    informal affected by a drug that makes the user feel happy, excited, or relaxed
    high on:

    He was high on cocaine.

    1. a.
      very happy or excited
      high on:

      The players were high on the emotion of it all.

      in high spirits:

      The children have been in high spirits all day.

  6. 8
    [only before noun] used in some expressions for referring to the greatest, strongest, or most extreme example or part of something
    high summer:

    Major football tournaments should not really be played in high summer.

    high fashion:

    In the 1980s this was high fashion.

    high drama (=exciting events):

    It was a day of high drama.

    high politics/finance:

    This is high politics played for high stakes.

    a new TV drama series set in the world of high finance

phrases

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