Did you know?

Click any word in a definition or example to find the entry for that word

dot - definition and synonyms


What are red words?

90% of the time, speakers of English use just 7,500 words in speech and writing. These words appear in red, and are graded with stars. One-star words are frequent, two-star words are more frequent, and three-star words are the most frequent.



Thesaurus diagram

The thesaurus of synonyms and related words is fully integrated into the dictionary. Click on the thesaurus category heading under the button in an entry to see the synonyms and related words for that meaning.

noun [countable]     dot pronunciation in American English
Word Forms
  1. 1
    a very small spot of ink or color

    The female fish is yellow, with tiny orange dots on the tail.

  2. 2
    something that looks very small because it is far away

    We watched until the airplane was just a dot in the sky.

  3. 3
    a short flash of light or sound used in Morse code (=a system for sending messages, used especially in the past). A long flash or sound is called a dash.
  4. 4
    computing the way that you say the symbol . in an Internet or e-mail address

    The URL is www dot, google dot, com.

  5. From our crowdsourced Open Dictionary
    join the dots to make connections between seemingly unrelated people or events so you can understand what is happening

    Lack of capacity to process information about suspects may explain, in part, the failure to join the dots over the gathering terror plot.

    Submitted from United Kingdom on 17/11/2015
quiz invitation


a description of an economic or political situation based on analysis of information at the present time

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary


an unregulated form of capitalism that features financial deregulation, privatisation and low tax for high earners

add a word


A must for anyone with an interest in the changing face of language. The Macmillan Dictionary blog explores English as it is spoken around the world today.

global English and language change from our blog
Macmillan learn live love play