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Describing types and forms of verbs - synonyms or related words

active

adjective

linguistics

in active verbs or clauses, the subject is the person or thing that does or is responsible for the action of the verb. For example in the sentence ‘The crowd was making a bit of noise throughout the game’, the verb group ‘was making’ is active, and the clause is in the active voice.

causative

adjective

linguistics

used for describing verbs, forms, and structures that show that something causes something to happen. For example, in the sentence ‘She makes me laugh’, ‘makes’ is a causative verb.

continuous

adjective

linguistics

ditransitive

adjective

a ditransitive verb has both a direct object and an indirect object. In the sentence ‘Pour him some tea’, ‘pour’ is ditransitive.

dynamic

adjective

linguistics

used for describing verbs likelisten’, ‘talk’, or ‘go’ that deal with actions as opposed to verbs likeknow’ or ‘own’ that deal with states

ergative

adjective

an ergative verb, such as 'close’, 'change’, ‘cook’, ‘worry’, and ‘calm down’, is both transitive and intransitive. When it is transitive, its object can be the same as its subject when it is intransitive. For example in the sentenceJack thought the money would change his life’, the verbchange’ is transitive, and in the sentence ‘When he was eleven, his whole life changed’, the verbchange’ is intransitive and there is no mention of anything that has caused ‘his life’ to change.

finite

adjective

linguistics

a finite clause has a verb that shows a particular tense and agrees with the subject in number. For example ‘she plays the guitar’ is a finite clause. The verbplaysindicates present tense and a singular subject.

future

adjective

linguistics

relating to the future tense of a verb

imperative

adjective

linguistics

the imperative form of a verb expresses an order to do something

imperfect

adjective

linguistics

an imperfect form of a verb describes an action in the past that is continuous, repeated, or not finished

impersonal

adjective

linguistics

an impersonal verb or sentence usually has the word ‘it’ as its subject

intransitive

adjective

an intransitive verb has no direct object, for examplearrive’, ‘escape’, ‘occur’, ‘fall’, and ‘scream’. In the sentence ‘She grew up in Bristol’, the verbgrow up’ is intransitive.

non-finite

adjective

a non-finite clause has a verb that is either a participle or an infinitive with ‘to’, and does not show tense or number. For example in the sentenceTurning left, we came to a large entrance’, the clauseturning left’ is non-finite.

perfect

adjective

linguistics

progressive

adjective

linguistics

the progressive aspect indicates that an action, situation, or event is seen as continuing during a particular period of time. The progressive verb group consists of a form of ‘be’ and a present participle (‘-ing’ form). For example in the sentence ‘The forests are dying and the fish are disappearing’, ‘dying’ and ‘disappearing’ are seen as happening now. In the sentence ‘In the 1990s the company was losing £200 million a year’, ‘losing’ was going on during a period in the past.

sing.

abbreviation

singular

singular

adjective

a singular verb, or the singular form of a verb, is used for talking about actions taken by one person or thing

stative

adjective

used for describing verbs likeknow’ or ‘own’ that deal with states, as opposed to verbs likelisten’, ‘talk’, or ‘go’ that deal with actions

transitivity

noun

the fact of a verb being transitive, or the question of whether a verb is transitive or intransitive

transitive

adjective

a transitive verb has a direct object, and is not normally used without one, for exampleappoint’, ‘injure’, ‘own’, ‘blame’, and ‘bring up’ (a child). In the sentence ‘Our educational toys support and encourage creative learning’, ‘support’ and ‘encourage’ are transitive verbs. Many transitive verbs are often used without objects, and are labelledintransitive/transitive’ in this dictionary. For example in the sentence ‘We’re looking for teachers who can really teach’, ‘teach’ is intransitive, and in ‘Alex teaches history and politics’, ‘teach’ is transitive.

weak

adjective

a weak verb forms the past tenses in a regular way. Weak verbs in English do this by adding ‘-ed’, ‘-d’, or ‘-t’ to the infinitive.

intransitively

adverb

intransitivity

noun

subjunctive

adjective

transitively

adverb

Open Dictionary

crafternoon

an afternoon full of crafts

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