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Describing types and forms of adjectives - synonyms or related words

adjectival

adjective

relating to or used as an adjective

attributive

adjective

an adjective is attributive when it comes before a noun. For example in the noun groupsdark evenings’ and ‘mysterious events’, ‘dark’ and ‘mysterious’ are attributive. Some adjectives, such as ‘southern’ and ‘indoor’ are always attributive.

comparative

adjective

linguistics

the comparative form of an adjective or adverb is the form that shows that someone or something has more of a quality than they previously had or more of it than someone or something else has. For example, ‘newer’ is the comparative form of the adjectivenew’ and ‘more actively’ is the comparative form of the adverbactively’.

gradable

adjective

a gradable adjective can be used with words such as ‘very’, ‘more’, or ‘less’, or have comparative and superlative forms. ‘Big’, ‘happy’, and ‘expensive’ are examples of gradable adjectives.

predicative

adjective

an adjective is predicative when it follows a linking verb such as ‘be’ or ‘seem’. In the sentence ‘She was right and I was wrong’, the adjectivesright’ and ‘wrong’ are predicative. Some adjectives, such as ‘afraid’, ‘asleep’, ‘alive’, and ‘unable’ are always predicative.

superlative

adjective

linguistics

a superlative adjective or adverb is one that expresses the greatest degree of a particular quality. For example the superlative form of ‘happy’ is ‘happiest’.

adjectivally

adverb

attributively

adverb

predicatively

adverb

Open Dictionary

crafternoon

an afternoon full of crafts

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