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Death and general words relating to death - thesaurus

Synonyms

morbidity

noun

the number of people affected by a particular disease

death

noun

the state of being dead

death

noun

an occasion when someone dies

mortality

noun

the number of deaths within a particular area, group etc

mortality

noun

formal death

mortality

noun

the fact that your life will end

dying

adjective

done or spoken just before death

bereavement

noun

the situation you are in when a close friend or family member has just died

death rate

noun

the number of deaths in a particular area in one year

bereaved

adjective

a bereaved person is someone whose close friend or family member has recently died

decease

noun

formal a person's death

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More synonyms

the bereaved

noun

someone whose close friend or family member has recently died

bereavement

noun

an instance of a close friend or a member of your family dying

bless his/her soul

used for showing love or respect when you talk about someone who is dead

d.

abbreviation

died: used before the date of someone’s death

deathbed

noun

a bed in which someone dies or is about to die

deathbed

adjective

done when you are about to die

death certificate

noun

an official document signed by a doctor providing details of how and when someone died

deathly

adjective

making you think of death or a dead person

deathly

adverb

in a way that makes you think of death or a dead person

death rattle

noun

a sound sometimes made in the throat of someone who is dying

death sentence

noun

informal something that will cause someone to die

death throes

noun

uncontrolled shaking and twisting movements of someone who is dying in pain

death toll

noun

the number of people who are killed on a particular occasion

demise

noun

very formal the death of a person

end

noun

literary someone’s death

fatality

noun

the ability of a disease or accident to kill people

ghoulish

adjective

getting pleasure from unpleasant situations involving death

the grave

noun

literary death

the Grim Reaper

noun

an imaginary character who represents death. It is usually shown as a skeleton wearing a long black cloak with a hood and carrying a scythe (=a tool for cutting grass).

in extremis

adverb

formal at the moment when you are about to die

last gasp

mainly literary the last breath that someone takes before dying

last words

noun

the last thing that someone says before they die

lose

verb

if you lose a member of your family or a friend, they die

lose someone to something

if you lose someone to something such as a disease, they die as a result of it

loss

noun

the death of someone

loss of life

the deaths of a lot of people in an accident, war etc

morbid

adjective

showing a strong interest in subjects such as death that most people think are unpleasant

passing

noun

someone’s death. This word is used to avoid saying ‘death’ when you think this might upset someone

posthumous

adjective

given to someone after their death, or happening after their death

quietus

noun

literary death

rigor mortis

noun

a condition that affects the body after death, in which it becomes stiff

someone’s last/final breath

the moment when someone dies

someone would turn in their grave

used for saying that someone who is now dead would be very surprised or sad about something that is happening if they could see it

sympathy card

noun

a card that you send to say you are sorry that someone has died

BuzzWord

gaslight

to manipulate someone psychologically so that they begin to question their own perceptions and memories

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

Dunning-Kruger effect

the phenomenon by which an incompetent person is too incompetent to understand his own incompetence

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