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Words used to describe patterns and arrangements

broken

adjective

a broken pattern or sound has spaces in it

candy-striped

adjective

covered with a pattern of narrow lines of colour on a white background

checked

adjective

printed or woven in a pattern of squares

checkered

adjective

the American spelling of chequered

chequered

adjective

a chequered pattern or design consists of squares in two or more different colours

chronological

adjective

arranged or described in the order in which events happened

criss-cross

adjective

consisting of straight lines that cross one another

dappled

adjective

covered with or forming areas of lighter and darker colour or light and shadow

even

adjective

similar in size and arranged in a level line with equal spaces between

flecked

adjective

with small spots of colour

flowered

adjective

decorated with a pattern of flowers

flowery

adjective

decorated with a pattern of flowers

fluted

adjective

decorated with long deep parallel lines

grained

adjective

with fibres in a clear arrangement, pattern, or direction

-grained

suffix

used with some adjectives for describing substances such as wood or stone that have a particular arrangement, pattern, or direction of fibres

in

adjective, adverb, preposition

arranged in a way that forms a particular shape or pattern

linear

adjective

consisting of lines or of one straight line

marbled

adjective

containing lines of another colour that are not regular in shape

matching

adjective

with the same colour, pattern, or design

monochrome

adjective

using different shades of a single colour

mottled

adjective

covered with spots of light or dark colours of different shapes

ornate

adjective

decorated with complicated patterns or shapes

patterned

adjective

decorated with a pattern

psychedelic

adjective

psychedelic clothes, designs etc are very brightly coloured and have big unusual patterns

radial

adjective

a radial pattern or design consists of straight lines that all go out from the centre of a circle

regular

adjective

arranged so that there is the same amount of time between events or the same amount of space between objects

scalloped

adjective

decorated with a row of curves along the edge

serial

adjective

arranged in a series, or forming part of a series

serried

adjective

arranged very close together in rows

shapeless

adjective

not organized or arranged in an effective way

spaced

adjective

arranged a particular time or distance apart

speckled

adjective

covered with a lot of small spots or marks

spotted

adjective

decorated or covered with a pattern of spots

spotty

adjective

covered with a pattern of spots

striated

adjective

a striated surface has long straight lines in it or on it

striped

adjective

with a pattern of stripes

stripey

another spelling of stripy

stripy

adjective

with a pattern of stripes

tessellated

adjective

formed or decorated in a pattern that is made with small pieces of glass or stone

tie-dyed

adjective

tie-dyed cloth has unusual patterns on it made by tying the cloth before it is dyed so that the colour does not go on some parts

tiered

adjective

arranged in rows, with each row slightly higher than the row in front

variegated

adjective

with different colours on the leaves or flowers

well-balanced

adjective

arranged so as to balance well

chronologically

adverb

ornately

adverb

paisley

adjective

pinstriped

adjective

polka-dot

adjective

serially

adverb

swirly

adjective

tartan

adjective

whorled

adjective

mom jeans

a style of loose-fitting jeans with a high waist, often considered unfashionable

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

endies

Employed but with No Disposable Income or Savings: people who are in work but only earn just enough to live on

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