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Words used to describe language

agglutinative

adjective

an agglutinative language joins words together to make new words

classical

adjective

used for referring to an ancient form of a language used during a time when important literature was written

cognate

adjective

cognate words or languages have the same origin

contextual

adjective

connected with a particular context

creole

adjective

relating to languages that are creoles

dead

adjective

a dead language such as Latin is no longer used by people in their ordinary lives

disyllabic

adjective

disyllabic words have two syllables

extinct

adjective

an extinct animal, plant, or language no longer exists

figurative

adjective

if you use words in a figurative way, you use them not in their normal literal meaning but in a way that makes a description more interesting or impressive

figuratively

adverb

using words not in their normal literal meaning but in a way that makes a description more interesting or impressive

idiomatic

adjective

containing idioms or consisting of an idiom

inflected

adjective

an inflected language has words that inflect

linguistic

adjective

relating to languages, words, or linguistics

literal

adjective

the literal meaning of a word is its most basic meaning

literally

adverb

in the most basic, obvious meanings of the words that are used

metaphorical

adjective

a metaphorical word, phrase, image etc is intended to represent or emphasize particular aspects of something else

metaphorical

adjective

using metaphors

monosyllabic

adjective

a monosyllabic word has only one syllable

native

adjective

your native language or native tongue is the first language that you learn, usually in the country where you were born

non-standard

adjective

non-standard forms of language are different from those that are usually considered to be correct

old

adjective

used with the names of languages to refer to the form of the language that was used in the past

phatic

adjective

used for describing words or phrases that you use for social reasons, for example in order to be friendly, rather than in order to give information

pidgin

adjective

used for describing speech or language in which a foreign language is mixed with the speaker’s first language

polysemous

adjective

a polysemous word has more than one meaning

proverbial

adjective

used when you are describing something with an expression from a proverb

sesquipedalian

adjective

used to describe a very long word with many syllables

spoken

adjective

spoken language is things that people say, not things that they write

synonymous

adjective

if two words are synonymous, they have the same meaning or almost the same meaning

tautological

adjective

a tautological statement, sentence etc repeats its meaning in an unnecessary way by using different words to say the same thing

technical

adjective

technical language is difficult to understand for people who do not know a lot about the subject

umbrella

adjective

an umbrella word is used for talking about a lot of specific things of the same general type

unmarked

adjective

an unmarked word or phrase is generally used in normal English rather than being, for example, formal or informal

unpronounceable

adjective

difficult to pronounce

binomial

adjective

linguistically

adverb

metaphorically

adverb

polysyllabic

adjective

proverbially

adverb

tautologically

adverb

vernacular

adjective

the deep web

a part of the Internet that cannot be accessed with conventional browsers or search tools, often used for illegal activity

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

digital hermit

a person who avoids using modern technologies like e-mail or the Internet

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