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Words used to describe height

elevated

adjective

raised above the ground, or higher than the surrounding area

high

adjective

used in measurements of how big or how far above the ground an object is. This is called height

high

adverb

reaching up a long way

higher

comparative of high

knee-high

adjective

high enough to reach your knees

level

adjective

at the same height

lofty

adjective

a lofty building or structure is very tall

low

adjective

small in height, or smaller than the usual height

low-rise

adjective

a low-rise building has only a few levels. A high-rise building has many levels.

precipitous

adjective

very high and steep

raised

adjective

a raised area is higher than the area around it

short

adjective

measuring a small height, length, or distance

short

adjective

not long enough, or not tall enough

shoulder-high

adjective, adverb

as high as your shoulders

sky-high

adjective, adverb

very high

soar

verb

to be very tall and impressive

tall

adjective

a tall person or object has greater height than the average person or object

tall

adjective

used for talking about measurements of height

towering

adjective

much taller than surrounding people or things

waist-high

adjective, adverb

high enough to reach your waist

soaring

adjective

tallness

noun

knee-high to a grasshopper

very small, because you are very young

dark pool

a method of financial trading in which share prices are hidden and not openly available to the public

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the gear that you use for driving a vehicle very slowly

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