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Varieties and types of english

Basic English

noun

a simple form of English consisting of 850 words, as well as some international and scientific words. It was originally intended for use as an international language.

BBC English

noun

the standard pronunciation of British English

Black English

noun

a type of English spoken by some black people, especially in the US

British English

noun

the type of English that people speak in Great Britain

cockney

noun

a type of informal English that cockneys speak

ELF

noun

English as a lingua franca: a form of English that is sometimes used as a way of communicating by people whose first languages are not English, and that has some features that are not usually considered to be correct in standard English

Estuary English

noun

a way of speaking that many people from London and southeastern England have. It combines some features of standard English with others that are typical of London and areas around the Thames estuary, for example using a glottal stop for the ‘t’ sound.

Geordie

noun

the type of English that people speak in northeastern England

Middle English

noun

the form of the English language that was spoken and written from about 1150 to 1470

the Queen’s English

noun

the form of spoken and written British English that is considered correct by most people

Received Pronunciation

noun

RP

RP

noun

Received Pronunciation: a way of speaking British English that is considered to be the standard pronunciation in the UK

Scots

noun

a variety of English spoken in Scotland

Standard English

noun

the form of spoken and written English that is considered acceptable by most people

Strine

noun

Australian English

World English

noun

if a word belongs to World English, it is used and recognized by people in all the countries where English is spoken

World English

noun

all the different varieties of English used in countries across the world

broken English

if someone speaks in broken English etc, they speak slowly and make a lot of mistakes because they do not know the language very well

infobesity

the condition of continually consuming large amounts of information, especially when this has a negative effect on a person's well-being and ability to concentrate

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

drive-by handshake

a brief handshake that is made without pausing or making eye contact, because you are upset or angry

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A must for anyone with an interest in the changing face of language. The Macmillan Dictionary blog explores English as it is spoken around the world today.

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