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Types of locks and bolts

bolt

noun

a metal bar that you slide across a door or window in order to lock it

catch

noun

an object used for fastening something such as a window, door, or container

combination lock

noun

a lock that you open using a series of numbers or letters in a particular order

dead bolt

noun

the metal bar of a lock that closes when you turn a key or handle

deadlock

noun

a lock that closes with a small metal bar when you turn a key or handle

fastening

noun

something such as a lock, catch, or bolt that you use to keep a door, gate, or window closed

hasp

noun

a flat piece of metal that fits over a curved piece in order to fasten a door or lid

keyhole

noun

the hole in a lock where you put the key

latch

noun

an object for keeping a door, gate etc fastened shut, consisting of a metal bar that fits into a hole or slot

latch

noun

a lock for a door that needs a key to open it from the outside but can be opened from the inside without a key by turning a small handle

lock

noun

a part of a door, drawer, suitcase etc used for fastening it so that no one can open it. You usually open and close locks with a key, but if you pick a lock, you use something else to open it, often illegally

mortice

another spelling of mortise

mortise lock

noun

a strong lock that fits into a hole cut into the frame around a door

padlock

noun

a lock that you can fix to something such as a gate, bicycle, or suitcase. It has a curved bar on top that moves when you open the lock with a key.

Yale lock

a type of lock that is very popular in the UK as the main lock on the front door of a house, because it is thought to be very safe

Open Dictionary

garbage patch

a collection of debris, mostly consisting of plastic, which moves around in the sea …

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