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To have or use teeth

bite

verb

to use your teeth to cut or break something, usually in order to eat it

bite at

to try to bite something without in fact managing to bite it

bite

noun

an act of cutting or breaking something using your teeth in order to eat it

champ

verb

to bite or eat food noisily

chatter

verb

if your teeth chatter, they knock together from fear or cold

chew

verb

to use your teeth to bite food in your mouth into small pieces so that you can swallow it

chew

verb

to bite something continuously but not swallow it

chew

verb

if you chew your nails or your lips, you bite them continuously, especially because you are feeling nervous

chew up

to chew something for a long time, until it is very soft or in very small pieces and easy to swallow

chomp

verb

to bite something several times in a noisy way

crunch

verb

to bite hard food, causing it to make a loud noise

gnaw

verb

to keep biting something

masticate

verb

to chew (=crush food between your teeth)

nibble

verb

to bite the surface of something gently several times

nip

verb

to bite someone gently

teethe

verb

to start to get your first teeth as a baby

mastication

noun

teething

noun

cut a tooth

if a child cuts a tooth, it starts to grow through the gum

gnash your teeth

to bite your teeth together and from side to side because you are very angry

grind your teeth

to rub your top and bottom teeth together in a way that makes a noise

grit your teeth

to press your teeth together tightly, for example because you are angry or in pain

kabaddi

a game in which two teams of seven players take turns to chase and try to touch players on the opposing team

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

Ouch!

a response to a scathing comment or unpleasant situation

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