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Click any word in a definition or example to find the entry for that word

Short forms

aren’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘are not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

aren’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘am not’ in questions

can’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing cannot. This is not often used in formal writing

couldn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘could not’. This is not used in formal writing.

-’d

short form

a way of writing ‘had’ or ‘would’. This is not often used in formal writing

daren’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘dare not’. This is not often used in formal writing

didn’t

short form

the usual way of saying ‘did not’. This is also often used in writing, but not in formal writing.

doesn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘does not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

don’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘do not’. This is not often used in formal writing

don’t

short form

a way of saying ‘does not’. This use is not considered correct

’em

short form

a way of writing ‘them’ that shows how it sounds in informal conversation

hadn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘had not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

hasn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘has not’. This is not usually used in formal writing

haven’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘have not’. This is not often used in formal writing

he’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘he had’. This is not often used in formal writing

he’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘he would’. This is not often used in formal writing

he’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘he will’. This is not often used in formal writing

he’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘he is’. This is not often used in formal writing

he’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘he has’. This is not often used in formal writing

I’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘I had’. This is not often used in formal writing

I’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘I would’. This is not often used in formal writing

I’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘I will’ or ‘I shall’. This is not often used in formal writing

I’m

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘I am’. This is not often used in formal writing

isn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘is not’. This is not often used in formal writing

it’d

short form

a way of saying or writing ‘it would’. This is not usually used in formal writing

it’d

short form

a way of saying or writing ‘it had’ when ‘have’ is used as an auxiliary verb. This is not usually used in formal writing

it’ll

short form

a way of saying and writing ‘it will’. This is not usually used in formal writing

it’s

short form

a way of saying or writing ‘it is’. This is not usually used in formal writing

it’s

short form

a way of saying ‘it has’ when ‘have’ is used as an auxiliary verb. This is not usually used in formal writing

I’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘I have’. This is not often used in formal writing

let’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘let us’. This is not often used in formal writing.

mightn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘might not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

mustn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘must not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

needn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘need not’. This is not used in formal writing

oughtn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘ought not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

-’s

short form

a way of saying or writing ‘is’ and ‘has’. This is not often used in formal writing

-’s

short form

a way of saying ‘does’ in some questions, that many people consider to be incorrect

-’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘us’ when you use it with ‘let’ to make a suggestion

shan’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘shall not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

she’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘she had’. This is not often used in formal writing

she’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘she would’. This is not often used in formal writing

she’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘she will’. This is not often used in formal writing

she’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘she is’. This is not often used in formal writing

she’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘she has’. This is not often used in formal writing

short

adjective

using fewer words or letters than the full form of something

shouldn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘should not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

they’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘they would’. This is not often used in formal writing

they’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘they had’ when ‘had’ is an auxiliary verb. This is not often used in formal writing

they’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘they will’. This is not often used in formal writing

they’re

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘they are’. This is not often used in formal writing

they’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘they have’ when ‘have’ is an auxiliary verb. This is not often used in formal writing

’tis

short form

it is

’twas

short form

it was

’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘have’, added to the end of ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’, or ‘they’ to form the present perfect tense. This is not often used in formal writing

wasn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘was not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

we’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘we had’ or ‘we would’. This is not often used in formal writing.

we’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘we shall’ or ‘we will’. This is not often used in formal writing.

we’re

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘we are’. This is not often used in formal writing.

weren’t

short form

the usual way of saying ‘were not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

we’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘we have’. This is not often used in formal writing.

what’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘what is’ or ‘what has’. This is not often used in formal writing.

who’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘who had’ or ‘who would’. This is not often used in formal writing.

who’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘who will’. This is not often used in formal writing.

who’re

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘who are’. This is not often used in formal writing.

who’s

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘who is’ or ‘who has’. This is not often used in formal writing.

who’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘who have’. This is not often used in formal writing.

won’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘will not’. This is not often used in formal writing.

wouldn’t

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘would not’. This is not often used in formal writing

would’ve

short form

the usual way of saying ‘would have’

you’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘you had’. This is not often used in formal writing.

you’d

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘you would’. This is not often used in formal writing.

you’ll

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘you will’. This is not often used in formal writing.

you’re

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘you are’. This is not often used in formal writing.

you’ve

short form

the usual way of saying or writing ‘you have’. This is not often used in formal writing.

Word of the Day

resurrection

the occasion on which Jesus Christ was brought back to life after his death, according to the Bible

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