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Verb forms and tenses - synonyms or related words

the active

noun

aspect

noun

linguistics

the form of a verb group indicating whether an action, event, or situation is seen as continuing or as complete. In English there are two aspects, the progressive, such as ‘is arriving’ or ‘was arriving’, and the perfective, such as ‘has seen’ and ‘had seen’.

auxiliary

noun

auxiliary verb

noun

the verbs ‘be’, ‘do’, and ‘have’ in English, when they are used with another verb to form tenses, questions, question tags, and the passive. For example in the sentences ‘I am listening’, ‘Are you working?’, ‘You don’t like her, do you?’ and ‘The bill has been paid’, ‘am’, ‘are’, ‘do’, and ‘has been’ are all auxiliary verbs.

conjugation

noun

the way that you conjugate a particular verb

conjugation

noun

a group of verbs that all conjugate using the same pattern

copula

noun

a linking verb

do

verb

used instead of repeating the same verb that was used earlier in the sentence, or in a previous sentence

the first person

noun

linguistics

the form of the pronoun or verb that you use about yourself, and about someone who is with you. The first person pronouns in English are “I,” “me,” “we,” and “us.”

the future

noun

linguistics

the forms of a verb group used to talk about time after the present. In English future time is usually indicated using ‘will’ or a form of ‘be’ followed by ‘going to’, and the infinitive of a verb. For example in the sentences ‘Full details of all courses will be available shortly’ and ‘We are going to play brilliantly’, the verb groups ‘will be’ and ‘going to playindicate future time.

the future perfect

noun

the tense used to talk about actions or states that will be finished or in progress at a particular time in the future. The future perfect consists of ‘will have’ and a past participle, for example ‘will have risen’ in the sentence ‘It's likely that by 2100, average world temperatures will have risen by two to five degrees’.

imperative

noun

linguistics

the form of a verb that expresses orders. The imperative is also called the imperative mood.

the imperfect

noun

the form of a verb that describes an action in the past that is continuous, repeated, or not finished. The imperfect is also called the imperfect tense.

indicative

noun

a form of a verb used for making statements or asking questions

infinitive

noun

the basic form of a verb. In English, this form of the verb together with the word “to” in front of it is usually called a to-infinitive, and the verb form on its own is usually called a bare infinitive.

linking verb

noun

a verb such as ‘be’, ‘seem’, and ‘appear’ that connects the subject of a clause with a complement. For example in the sentence ‘He was a cheerful man and seemed happy in his old age’, ‘was’ and ‘seemed’ are linking verbs, and ‘a cheerful man’ and ‘happy’ are its complements.

modal

noun

modal auxiliary

noun

modality

noun

linguistics

the ways in which people talk about their attitudes, obligations, and intentions. In English, modality is expressed by modal verbs such as ‘can’, ‘might’, and ‘should’, or by expressions such as ‘It’s likely that’, ‘I’m supposed to’, and ‘I’d better’.

modal verb

noun

a verb such as ‘must’, ‘may, ‘could, or ‘would’, that is used with another verb to express ideas such as obligation, permission, possibility, and intention. For example in the sentences ‘I can imagine what he would say to that’ and ‘Appointments should be made a week in advance’, ‘can’ ‘would’ and ‘should’ are modal verbs.

mood

noun

linguistics

a group of verb forms that are used to show whether, for example, a sentence is a statement, question, or order

participle

noun

in English, the present participle (‘-ing’ form) and the past participle (‘-ed’ form) of a verb, that are used for forming different tenses, in non-finite clauses, in passives, and as modifiers. For example in the sentences ‘Are you listening?', ‘After graduating she worked as a bus driver’, ‘Lunch is served at noon’, and ‘He begins the season with an injured foot’ the wordslistening’, ‘graduating’, served’, and ‘injured’ are all participles.

the passive

noun

the past

noun

linguistics

the forms of a verb group indicating that an action or event happened regularly, or that a situation existed or was true during a period before now. For example ‘he worked’, and ‘she was working’ are both in the past.

past participle

noun

in English, the ‘-ed’ form of a verb, that is used for forming the perfect tenses, in the passive, and as a modifier. For example in the clauses ‘Have you eaten yet’, ‘Payment must be made immediately’, and ‘Do you like fried fish?’, the wordseaten’, ‘made’ and ‘fried’ are all past participles.

the past perfect

noun

the past perfect simple and the past perfect continuous are the tenses used to talk about actions, behavior, or situations that began at a particular time in the past and were either complete or still continuing at that time. The past perfect simple consists of ‘had’ and a past participle, for example the verb group ‘had reached’ in the sentence ‘By 1900 the population of New York had reached almost three-and-a-half million’. The past perfect continuous consists of a form of ‘had’ followed by ‘been’ and a past participle, for example ‘had been planning‘ in the sentence ‘By February, he had been planning the event for seven months’.

the perfect

noun

the perfect tense

phrasal verb

noun

a combination of a verb and an adverb or preposition, which has a particular meaning, such as ‘look after’, ‘hurry up’, ‘give in’, ‘chill out’, ‘get away with’ and ‘bring up’. For example in the sentence ‘Don’t tell me how to bring up my children!’, ‘bring up’ meansraise’. An adverb or preposition in a phrasal verb is sometimes called a ‘particle’.

the pluperfect

noun

the past perfect tense of a verb

pres.

abbreviation

present

the present

noun

linguistics

the forms of a verb group indicating that an action or event happens regularly or is taking place now, or that a situation exists or is true now. For example ‘she works’ and ‘she’s working’ are both in the present.

present participle

noun

in English, the ‘-ing’ form of a verb, that is used for forming the ‘continuouspresent and past, and as a noun or noun modifier. For example in the clause ‘They were behaving in a threatening manner’, ‘behaving’ and ‘threatening’ are present participles.

the present perfect

noun

the present perfect simple and the present perfect continuous are the tenses used to talk about actions, behavior, or situations that began in the past and are complete or still continuing at the present moment. The present perfect simple consists of a form of ‘have’ and a past participle, for example the verb group ‘have bought’ in the sentence ‘I’ve bought the tent so let’s go camping!’ The present perfect continuous consists of a form of ‘have’ followed by ‘been’ and a present participle, for example ‘has been living’ in the sentence ‘My niece has been living with us all her life’.

the preterite

noun

the past tense

principal parts

noun

mainly British

the basic forms of an English verb, from which other verb forms are made, such as the infinitive, past tense, and past participle

reciprocal verb

noun

a verb that describes something that two people do to or with each other, for example the verbmeet” in the sentence “We always meet in the park.”

the second person

noun

the pronoun or form of a verb that refers to the person you are talking to. In English the second person pronoun is “you.”

split infinitive

noun

an infinitive in which there is an adverb between the word “to” and the verb, as in the phrase “to completely understand. Some people avoid this because they think it is bad style.

subjunctive

noun

the form of a verb that is used for expressing doubts and wishes. For example, in the sentence “I wish I were taller,” “were” is in the subjunctive. The indicative is used for making statements and asking questions about facts, and the imperative is used for telling someone to do something.

tense

noun

the forms of a verb group indicating whether an action, event, or situation happens or exists now, before now, or in the future. In English, the verb has present and past tense forms such as ‘arrive’ and ‘arrived’. Other verb groups indicating tense or time include participles and auxiliary verbs, for example ‘are arriving’, ‘have arrived’, ‘had arrived’, and ‘will arrive’.

the third person

noun

the set of pronouns and verb forms used for referring to someone or something that is not the speaker or the person being spoken to

v.

abbreviation

verb

verb

noun

a word such as ‘remain’, ‘run’, or ‘find out’ that refers to an action, event or state

verbal

adjective

linguistics

acting as a verb, or relating to a verb

verbally

adverb

linguistics

using a verb

verbing

noun

an example of a noun or other part of speech that has become a verb, for exampleimpact” in the sentence “How will this impact our sales going forward?”

voice

noun

linguistics

in English, voice refers to the choice of either an active verb group or a passive verb group. In the active voice, the subject is the person or thing that does or is responsible for the action of the verb. In the passive voice, the subject is the person or thing that is affected by the action of the verb. For example in the sentence ‘The kids have learned the importance of a healthier diet’, the verb group ‘have learned’ is active. In the sentenceLessons will be learned from this disaster’, the verb group ‘will be learned’ is passive.

ergative

noun

first/second/third person

the forms of pronouns or verbs that show who is being referred to. People use the first person (I) to refer to themselves, the second person (you) to refer to the person or people they are talking to, and the third person he/she/they to refer to anyone else

unicorn

a start-up … whose value has reached more than one billion US dollars

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

crafternoon

an afternoon full of crafts

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