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Words used to describe actions and activities

amateur

adjective

done for pleasure instead of as a job

attempted

adjective

used about things that someone tries to do but does not succeed in doing, especially things that are wrong or illegal

commemorative

adjective

done in order to honor and remember an important person or event

desperate

adjective

done because you can think of no other way

face-saving

adjective

done in order to stop people losing respect for you

hostile

adjective

done by one company to another that opposes its action

lame

adjective

done without much effort in a way that seems as though you are not trying very hard

lamely

adverb

in a way that does not seem sincere or enthusiastic

limp

adjective

done without energy or enthusiasm

maiden

adjective

done for the first time

official

adjective

done by people in authority

on-the-job

adjective

done or happening while you are at work

panic

noun

used about things that people do when they are frightened or worried

parting

adjective

done or said by someone when they are leaving

part-time

adjective

done for only part of the time that an activity is usually performed

personal

adjective

done by a person directly, instead of by a representative

physical

adjective

used about activities that involve people touching or hitting each other a lot

positive

adjective

if you do something positive, you do something to try to improve a situation or to help someone rather than doing nothing

preventative

adjective

preventive

preventive

adjective

done so that something does not become worse or turn into a problem

procedural

adjective

relating to a procedure, especially a legal one

reciprocal

adjective

done according to an arrangement by which you do something for someone who does the same thing for you

recreational

adjective

done or used for enjoyment

saltwater

adjective

done in the ocean

token

adjective

done simply in order to show people that you are doing something and not because what you do has any real importance or effectiveness

two-handed

adjective

involving the use of both hands

two-step

adjective

done in two stages

unprompted

adjective

done or said without anyone telling you to do or say it

actions speak louder than words

used for saying that what you do is more important than what you say you will do

for someone’s edification

done in order to increase someone’s knowledge or improve their character

in ones and twos

used for saying that people do things alone or in small groups

in pursuance of something

as part of the process of doing something

now...now

used for saying that someone or something does one thing and then does something different, especially while they are doing something else

on request

used for saying that something will be done if someone asks for it

on someone’s account

if you do something on someone’s account, you do it because you think they want you to

on someone’s behalf

in order to help someone

on someone’s part

done or experienced by someone

at someone’s request/at the request of someone

used for saying that something will be done because someone has asked for it

twice over/three times etc. over

doing something twice/three times etc.

emoji

a small digital image … which is used in electronic communication to express emotion or other simple concepts

BuzzWord Article

Open Dictionary

major on (doing) sth

to have or do a lot of something; to focus on a particular thing

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