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will

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modal verb British English pronunciation: will /wɪl/
Will is usually followed by an infinitive without 'to': She will be angry. Sometimes it is used without a following infinitive: I never have borrowed money, and I never will.
In conversation or informal writing will is often shortened to 'll: Do you think it'll rain?
Will does not change its form, so the third person singular form does not end in '-s': Robert will be there.
Questions and negatives are formed without 'do': Will you help me?They will not accept our offer.
The negative form will not is often shortened to won't in conversation or informal writing: Don't worry – the dog won't bite you.
Will is often used in question tags: You won't tell Dad, will you?
Will has no participles and no infinitive form. It is used for forming the future tense of other verbs, but does not have a future tense of its own.
Would can sometimes be used as the past tense of will, for example in indirect speech introduced by a verb in the past tense: He promised that he would return.
Will have forms the future perfect tense, which is used for describing actions that are expected to be completed before a time in the future: By the end of the course, you will have learned all the basic skills.
 
  1. 1
    used for talking about future actions or events
    1. a.
      used for saying what you expect to happen in the future

      Let's finish the job now – it won't take long.

      Who do you think will win on Saturday?

    2. b.
      used for saying what is planned or arranged for a future occasion

      There will be a short ceremony at the war memorial.

      The President will attend a lunch hosted by the Queen.

  2. 2
    used for showing that you are fairly certain that something is true

    Most of you will know about the problems we've been having.

    There's the doorbell. That'll be Janet.

  3. 3
    used for saying that you are willing to do something or that you intend to do it

    If you won't tell him the truth, I will.

    Who'll help me in the kitchen?

    will be glad/pleased/happy to do something:

    I'll be glad to answer any questions that you may have.

  4. 4
    used for asking someone to do something, especially when you are annoyed

    Will you please listen to what I'm saying!

    Will someone kindly tell me what is going on around here?

  5. 5
    used for making a polite offer or invitation

    Will you have a cup of tea?

    Won't you stay for lunch?

  6. 6
    used for saying whether something is possible

    Will these gloves fit you?

    £30 will buy enough food for a family for a week.

  7. 7
    formal used for ordering that something must be done

    All staff will attend regular training courses.

    You will not leave this house without my permission.

  8. 9
    used for saying that someone has a habit of doing something, especially when you do not approve of what they are doing

    If you will keep interrupting me, how can I answer your question?

    They'll happily spend the whole day playing computer games.

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