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star - definition and synonyms


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90% of the time, speakers of English use just 7,500 words in speech and writing. These words appear in red, and are graded with stars. One-star words are frequent, two-star words are more frequent, and three-star words are the most frequent.



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noun [countable] star pronunciation in British English /stɑː(r)/
Word Forms
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  1. 2
    a famous and popular person, especially an actor, entertainer, or sports personality

    a Hollywood/TV/pop/soccer star

    a big star:

    All the big stars were at the party.

    a child star:

    the former child star Shirley Temple

    a star in the making (=someone who is likely to become a star):

    I think we’ve got a star in the making here.

    make someone a star:

    With his contacts he can make you a star.

    1. a.
      [only before noun] typical of a star, or suitable for a star
      star quality:

      He’s a good player but he lacks star quality.

      star treatment (=very good and special treatment):

      She always gets star treatment wherever she goes.

    2. b.
      the main actor or performer in a film, play, television programme etc

      Today, he’s the star of a hundred-million-dollar movie.

      the star of the show (=the best actor or performer):

      The dog was undoubtedly the star of the show.

    See also all-star
  2. 3
    a sign shaped like a star that is given to a hotel or restaurant to show which group it belongs to according to its quality or importance

    How many stars does the hotel have?

    a three-star/five-star hotel/restaurant:

    We stayed in a five-star hotel on our honeymoon.

    1. a.
      a sign or small piece of paper shaped like a star that is given to someone, especially a child, as a reward for good work

      She got a gold star for her drawing.

    2. b.
      an object shaped like a star that some soldiers wear as a sign of their high rank
    3. c.
      a sign like a star with a lot of points, used for example in computers, on a telephone, or for marking something as important

      I’ve put stars next to the names I want you to check.

      Press star now.

  3. 4
    an object or shape with five or more points that looks like a star

    We always put a star at the top of our Christmas tree.

    the 50 stars on the US flag

  4. 5
    someone or something that is clearly better than all the other people or things in a group
    star of:

    McAllister was most definitely the star of the Scottish team.

    a rising star (of something):

    He had once been regarded as the rising star of the Party.

    a star pupil:

    Mick was a star pupil at his school.

    a star attraction:

    The Peugeot 805 is the star attraction at this year’s motor show.

  5. 6
    informal someone who does something kind and helpful

    Oh, that’s great. You’re a star!

  6. 7


    [plural] mainly literary a power that some people believe influences what happens in the future

    He wondered what the stars held for him now.

    1. a.
      British informal a horoscope

      Have you read your stars today?

      My stars say that I’m going to have a bad week.



to fall over forwards so that your face hits the ground or another surface

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the activity of exploring abandoned buildings and other manmade structures

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