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screen

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verb [transitive] British English pronunciation: screen /skriːn/ 
Word Forms
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present tense
I/you/we/theyscreen
he/she/itscreens
present participlescreening
past tensescreened
past participlescreened
  1. 1
    to test someone to find out if they have a particular illness
    screen someone for something:

    He recommends screening pregnant women for diabetes.

  2. 2
    mainly journalism to broadcast a television programme, or to show a film

    The series is currently being screened on BBC2 on Fridays.

  3. 3
    to hide someone or something by being in front of them
    screen something from something:

    A line of fir trees screened the house from the road.

  4. 4
    to get information in order to decide whether someone is suitable for something, for example a job

    All potential foster parents are carefully screened.

    1. a.
      to check something to decide whether it is suitable, especially for someone else

      So many journalists were phoning him that he decided to screen his calls.

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