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rest

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verb British English pronunciation: rest /rest/ 
Word Forms
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present tense
I/you/we/theyrest
he/she/itrests
present participleresting
past tenserested
past participlerested
  1. 1
    [intransitive] to spend a period of time relaxing or sleeping after doing something tiring

    It would be nice to sit down and rest for a while.

    She rested in her chair with her head back.

    1. a.
      [transitive] to not use a part of your body that is tired or injured so that it can get better
      rest your eyes:

      He read to her for an hour while she rested her eyes.

  2. 2
    [transitive] to put something somewhere for support, especially a part of your body
    rest something on/against something:

    She rested her head against a cushion.

    He picked up his briefcase, resting it on the desk.

    1. a.
      [intransitive] to be supported on, against, or in something
      rest on/against/in:

      John was now asleep, with his head resting on my shoulder.

  3. 3
    [intransitive] if your eyes rest on someone or something, you look at that person or thing for a period of time
    rest on:

    She let her gaze rest on his face for a moment.

  4. 4
    [intransitive] a word meaning to be buried somewhere, used when you think it will upset someone if you say this word
    rest in/beside etc:

    He rests in Oakhampton churchyard.

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