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last

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adjective, adverb, determiner, noun, pronoun British English pronunciation: last /lɑːst/
Last can be used in the following ways:
as a determiner (followed by a noun): I saw him last night. ♦ I wasn't here last time.
as an adjective (after a determiner and before a noun): My last job was in London. ♦ I ate the last piece of cake. (after the verb 'to be'): I was last in the race.
as a pronoun (after 'the'): Their new CD is even better than the last. ♦ And that was the last I saw of him.
as an adverb: When did you see him last? ♦ I put my shoes on last.
as a noun (followed by 'of'): I drank up the last of the wine.
 
  1. 1
    used for referring to the week, month, year etc that ended most recently
    last week/year/Saturday etc:

    How did you boys sleep last night?

    Last year the company made a profit of £350 million.

    1. a.
      used for referring to a period of time that has continued up to the present
      the last week/month/year etc:

      Over the last 15 years there has been a 50% increase in the traffic on our roads.

      During the last hour we have been receiving reports of an explosion in the city centre.

    2. b.
      used for referring to a particular event, occasion, person, or thing that is the most recent one of its kind

      The last time we met both of us had just started new jobs.

      They've had only one win from their last eight matches.

      I'm afraid I don't agree with that last comment.

      I had my last child at home.

      His next book will be even better than his last.

      I last saw her three years ago.

  2. 2
    happening or coming at the end after all the others

    I swear this is the last cigarette I will ever smoke.

    Fry the onions until crisp, and add them last.

    Tonight's performance is the last in a series.

    the last of:

    When the last of the lorries had gone by, the street was reopened.

    the last to do something:

    Janice was the last to leave.

    Why am I always the last to find out about these parties?

    the last someone sees/hears of:

    His plane disappeared into the clouds, and that was the last we ever saw of him.

  3. 3
    used for referring to someone or something that remains after all the rest have gone, or to part of an amount that remains after the rest has been used

    I wouldn't marry him if he was the last man on earth.

    the last surviving copy of the manuscript

    I hope to be among the last four in the tournament.

    the last of:

    He is the last of his generation.

    Who wants the last of the ice cream?

  4. 4
    used for emphasizing that someone or something is not at all likely, suitable, or wanted in a particular situation

    The last thing we need is a tax rise.

    Hurting you is the last thing I'd want to do.

    I'm the last person you should be asking for advice.

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