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flavour - definition and synonyms

 
 
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noun flavour pronunciation in British English /ˈfleɪvə(r)/
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singularflavour
pluralflavours

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  1. 1
    [countable] the particular taste that food or drink has
    a nutty/spicy/bitter flavour
    a distinctive/delicate/subtle flavour
    have a flavour: The drink has a very strong flavour of citrus fruit.
    give a flavour: Fresh ginger gives an eastern flavour to the dish.
    1. a.
      [uncountable] a pleasant or strong taste
      This beer has no flavour.
      add flavour: Add flavour to your meal by using more herbs and garlic.
  2. 2
    [singular/uncountable] an idea of what something is like
    give/impart a flavour: The music gives some flavour of the traditional ways of singing.
  3. 3
    [singular/uncountable] a particular quality that is typical of something
    The foreign visitors added an international flavour to the occasion.
    His paintings really catch the mood and flavour of the country.

phrase

normcore

a fashion trend in which people intentionally wear ordinary, inexpensive, widely-available clothing

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Open Dictionary

boutonnière

a flower or small bunch of flowers worn on the lapel of a jacket on special occasions

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